Natural Resource Use
Natural Resource Use+image

Natural Resource Use

Newsweek+image
Newsweek Green Score
Research | designer assessed
1051 2097
Newsweek+image
Energy Productivity
Research | designer assessed
959 2142
Newsweek+image
Water Productivity
Research | designer assessed
948 2016
Newsweek+image
Waste Productivity
Research | designer assessed
935 1961
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Total Water Withdrawals (G4-EN8-a)
Research | community assessed
685 1402
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Municipal Water Withdrawals (G4-EN8-a)
Research | community assessed
499 804
Newsweek+image
Greenhouse Gas Productivity
Research | designer assessed
372 373
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Water Recycled (%) (G4-EN10-b)
Research | community assessed
351 624
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Water Volume Recycled (G4-EN10-a)
Research | community assessed
339 611
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Ground Water Withdrawals (G4-EN8-a)
Research | community assessed
337 588
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Waste Water Used (G4-EN8-a)
Research | community assessed
323 555
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Total water discharge (G4-EN22-a)
Research | community assessed
322 512
321 552
Global Reporting Initiative+image
Surface Water Withdrawals (G4-EN8-a)
Research | community assessed
310 541
Green Power Usage
Research | designer assessed
64 64
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Palm Oil Sourcing Policies
Research | designer assessed
40 61
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Palm Oil Total Score
Research | designer assessed
40 75
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Deforestation-Free Palm Oil
Research | designer assessed
40 60
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Peat-free Palm Oil
Research | designer assessed
40 60
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Palm Oil Transparency
Research | designer assessed
40 60
Union of Concerned Scientists+Image
Palm Oil Traceability
Research | designer assessed
40 63
Richard Mills+Image
Publishes Smelters & Refiners
Research | community assessed
38 42
Greenpeace+image
Recycled Plastic in Products
Research | designer assessed
16 16
Greenpeace+image
Sustainable Sourcing of Fibers for Paper
Research | designer assessed
16 16
Greenpeace+image
Clean Electricity Plan
Research | designer assessed
16 16
Greenpeace+image
Clean Electricity Policy Advocacy
Research | designer assessed
16 16
Greenpeace+image
Product Energy Efficiency
Research | designer assessed
16 16
RSPO+image
RSPO Membership
Research | designer assessed
15 15
Greenpeace+image
Clean Energy Index
Research | designer assessed
11 21
Ethical Trading Initiative+image
ETI Membership
Research | designer assessed
9 9
Intensidad consumo de agua
Research | community assessed
0 0
Green Power %
Research | designer assessed
0 0
+Overview

The concept of "natural resource" is particularly broad and intuitively clear to most people. It could be defined, according to the Merriam Webster dictionary as "something (as a mineral, waterpower source, forest, or kind of animal) that is found in nature and is valuable to humans (as in providing a source of energy, recreation, or scenic beauty". However, it appears far more difficulto to set clear cut boundaries to what is to include in such a definition.

 Natural resources can be classified as follows:

  • Non renewable and non recyclable resources such as fossil fuels
  • Non renewable but recyclable resources, such as minerals
  • Quickly renewable resources such as fish
  • Slowly renewable resources such as forests
  • Environmental resources, such as air, water and soil
  • Flow resources, such as solar and wind energy
 

The issue of depletion plays an important role in the use of non renewable and renewable natural resources. In the renewable resources depletion occurs when extraction exceeds renewal rate. Environmental services include the sink function which assimilates and recycles waste products from production and consumption. Flow and environmental resources are not depleted and always exist.

However, environmental resources can be degraded by pollution, and rendered useless.

(Source: Sustainable Resource Use and Sustainable Development: A Contradiction?)