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Companies explicitly specified by direct selection.

This list was extracted on the 3rd of Febuary 2020, from:

https://www.hl.co.uk/shares/stock-market-summary/ftse-100

Description

The Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 Index, also called the FTSE 100 Index, FTSE 100, FTSE, or, informally, the "Footsie" /ˈfʊtsi/, is a share index of the 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange with the highest market capitalisation. It is seen as a gauge of prosperity for businesses regulated by UK company law. The index is maintained by the FTSE Group, a subsidiary of the London Stock Exchange Group, and is calculated in real time and published every second when the market is open.

The FTSE 100 broadly consists of the largest 100 qualifying UK companies by full market value. The total market value of a company is calculated by multiplying the share price of the company by the total number of shares they have issued. Many of these are internationally focused companies, however, so the index's movements are a fairly weak indicator of how the UK economy is faring and are significantly affected by the exchange rates of the Pound. A better indication of the UK economy is the FTSE 250 Index, as it contains a smaller proportion of international companies.

FTSE 100 companies represent about 81% of the entire market capitalisation of the London Stock Exchange. Even though the FTSE All-Share Index is more comprehensive, the FTSE 100 is by far the most widely used UK stock market indicator. Other related indices are the FTSE 250 Index (which includes the next largest 250 companies after the FTSE 100), the FTSE 350 Index (which is the aggregation of the FTSE 100 and 250), FTSE SmallCap Index and the FTSE Fledgling Index. The FTSE All-Share aggregates the FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and FTSE SmallCap.

Component companies must meet a number of requirements set out by the FTSE Group, including having a full listing on the London Stock Exchange with a Sterling or Euro denominated price on the Stock Exchange Electronic Trading Service, and meeting certain tests on nationality, free float, and liquidity.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Please note:

Royal Dutch Shell appears twice in the FTSE 100 list, because it has two classes of share listed on the London stock exchange. One has the ticker "RDSA", the other class of share has the ticker "RDSB".

The shares carry identical economic rights, but their cash dividends come with different tax implications. The A shares have a Dutch source for tax purposes and are subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax (15%), whereas the B shares have a UK source for tax purposes and are not subject to any withholding tax. 

Because Royal Dutch Shell does not report seperately on its policies and operations for the two different entities, the company appears only once on the FTSE 100 list on WikiRate.org

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